Archive for the ‘Nebido’ Category

Several professional athletes have been tied to a performance-enhancing drug smuggling investigation that originated in Western New York, according to multiple sources.

Multiple sources with knowledge of the investigation tell 2 On Your Side around a dozen NFL and MLB players have been interviewed by Federal authorities investigating HGH smuggling from Canada into the U.S.

Our sources were not certain if any of the NFL players currently play, or have ever played, for the Buffalo Bills. The players are witnesses in the case, not suspects, according to our sources.

The local probe stems from a September 2009 border-crossing incident at the Peace Bridge in Buffalo, where customs agents stopped and arrested Mary Anne Catalano. Catalano had been working for Toronto-based physician Dr. Anthony Galea, who reportedly has treated famous athletes including golfer Tiger Woods and Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez.

In court records, prosecutors said Catalano admitted to bringing Human Growth Hormone and other performance-enhancing substances into the United States on behalf of Dr. Galea. Authorities charged Catalano with smuggling. Her court case is pending.

Canadian authorities later searched Dr. Galea’s office and charged him with smuggling.

According to multiple sources, Catalano’s arrest also sparked an investigation in the United States. As part of that investigation, sources say federal investigators have interviewed approximately eight or nine current National Football League Players, as well as three or four current Major League Baseball Players. Our sources said the players are witnesses in the probe, not suspects. Each has some sort of connection to Dr. Galea. Our sources also said the case appears to be headed to a federal grand jury, or may have been heard by a grand jury already.

If the case goes to trial, it’s possible public court records will reveal the names of those professionals athletes.

Federal Prosecutor Paul Campana, of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Buffalo, said he could not discuss the case. U.S. Attorney William Hochul also has said he would not comment on the investigation. The Major League Baseball Players Association said it was aware of the investigation, but declined to comment. We’re awaiting a response from the NFL Players association.

A former Arizona nurse who played a role in a massive Mobile-based steroids conspiracy will not have to go to prison, a federal judge ruled last week.

Candace V. Toler, 56, admitted to writing steroids prescriptions in her ill fiancé’s name. Advisory sentencing guidelines called for a one-year prison sentence, but Assistant U.S. Attorney Donna Dobbins asked U.S. District Judge Ginny Granade for six months’ home confinement as a reward for Toler’s cooperation.

The judge said she believed even home confinement would serve no purpose. She sentenced Toler to three years’ probation.

David A. Wilbirt, who later married Toler, also pleaded guilty in the case. He admitted that he wrote bogus prescriptions to healthy people who were looking to build muscle mass. Applied Pharmacy Services in Mobile filled those prescriptions, according testimony at a trial earlier this year.

After Wilbirt suffered a stroke in February 2005, Toler acknowledged, she bought a signature stamp and continued to write prescriptions in his name at his request.

“It’s important to note that she did not instigate this conspiracy … but she did take steps to end it,” said Toler’s lawyer, Candace Kent. “I think it’s fair to say she stands in front of you embarrassed, humiliated — if not mortified.”

Kent said Toler told Wilbirt’s lawyer about his stroke, which led to a suspension of his medical license.

Dobbins praised Toler’s cooperation during the investigation and later at the trial of the Applied Pharmacy owners and pharmacists.

“Mrs. Toler was an important witness for the government, especially in light of the fact that the government did not call Dr. Wilbirt to the stand as a result of his illness,” she said.

Depot testosterone injections in men with metabolic syndrome and hypogonadism led to improvements in several important components of their disease, including significant weight loss and reduced glucose dysregulation, a researcher said here.

Interim results from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial showed that men receiving the hormone injections lost more than 4 kg (9 lb) in the first 30 weeks of a planned three-year study versus almost no change with placebo (P<0.001), reported Farid Saad, PhD, of Bayer Schering in Berlin.

Although fasting plasma glucose levels did not change, insulin levels dropped significantly among participants in the active treatment group, mainly among those with abnormally high levels at baseline, Saad told attendees here at the World Congress on Controversies to Consensus in Diabetes, Obesity, and Hypertension.

There were also trends toward normalized levels of certain blood lipids, serum leptin, and inflammation markers.

“In the complete response letter, the FDA has requested information from Endo to address the agency’s concerns regarding very rare but serious adverse events, including post-injection anaphylactic reaction and pulmonary oil microembolism. The letter also specified that the proposed Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) is not sufficient.”

“Physicians are often reluctant to prescribe testosterone for conditions not related to sexual function,” said co-investigator Farid Saad, PhD, head of scientific affairs for Men’s Healthcare at Bayer Schering Pharma in Berlin and an honorary professor in clinical research and endocrinology at Gulf Medical College, Ajman, United Arab Emirates. “However, our study shows that testosterone has a much wider therapeutic role than just for improving sexual desire and erectile function.”

This study sponsored by Schering shows male Testosterone replacement therapy using injectable Testosterone Undecanoate in a very positive light, other testosterone esters would of course have equal benefit but would require more frequent injections.